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~M y s t i c B o r n~{Chapter 2}

~M y s t i c B o r n~{Chapter 2}

Posted February 16th, 2019 by SarahJ

by Sarah J
in Ohio

Memories - Aurora

“Aurora! Get your sorry butt in the kitchen! I have to tell you something.” I hear my aunt yell. I groan, peeling my eyes open and immediately squinting against the sunlight shining through my open window by my bed. I glance at my alarm clock and immediately sit up. I slept ten minutes after my alarm. Again. As quickly as I can I dress in shorts and a sweatshirt, my go to outfit since the weather started getting warm. I grab my backpack from where it hangs on the end of my bed and rush out of my bedroom, heading down the cramped hall to the kitchen.

In the kitchen I find my aunt sitting at one end of our small table. Her hands are folded on the table, and underneath them is a pale white envelope. She gestures to the seat across from her in a sharp movement, her gaze stern as she watched me sit hesitantly on the other side of her. What on earth is this about?

My aunt took a deep breath, looked me dead in the eyes….  and then started to laugh. Her long brown hair fell in front of her eyes as she shook with laughter.

“Lizzie, what in God’s name was that all about?” I half shriek, pulling myself as far as I can from her with my backpack behind me. She took a shuddering breath, her smile as big as the moon.

“Oh you should’ve seen your face. Good grief Aurora, why so serious? Really though, look at what I found in the mail today.”

Still doubting my aunt’s sanity, I reach over and grab the envelope from her. I look at it before opening it, and the only thing on it’s plain white face is the name Aurora, in scrawly handwriting. My brow furrows with confusion, but my curiosity overwhelms my sense of caution and I rip the envelope open.

A note flutters out of it and into my waiting palm, where I flip it over. On the note it says,

 

Personal Invitation to the birthday party of Elijah Grigg on April 20. 6:00 pm - 11:00 pm at 436 Misty Lane.

  • E.G

 

I bark out a harsh laugh, letting loose the breath that I, for some reason, was holding in. “It’s just an invitation to a stupid party. I don’t even know the guy.” I roll my eyes and hand the note over to my aunt with a shrug. As she’s deciphering it, I shoulder my backpack again and grab an apple for breakfast, disappointed that I didn’t have enough time to make a cup of coffee to wake myself up.

Just as I’m about to head out the door my aunt says, “I think Elijah is the governor’s kid. And you’re going to the party.” My hand stops midway to the doorknob and I turn on my heel. “What?!”

My aunt Elizabeth looks up at me. “You literally have zero friends Aurora. And don’t look at me like that, because you and I both know it’s true. You need to go out and socialize. Live your life. You’re going to be a senior.”

I shake my head. “I have friends. 10 to be exact. And if you count Duke-” My aunt laughs.

“I mean real friends stupid. Cows can’t be your friends. Now go, the bus is going to be here.” I shake my head again and head out the door.

As I weave my way through the trailers in our trailer park, I breathe in the salty ocean air, my shoulder length, light brown hair blowing out behind me. My torn up sneakers turn up the gravel as I walk up to stand on the edge of the road to wait for my bus to pick me up. As I wait, I breathe in the view.

Just across Willow Drive starts a field of tall, pale grass. If you didn’t look hard enough, you’d think the field stretched on forever, but if you looked hard enough you’d see the beginning of the ocean. I turn my head to the left and see the familiar stretch of road that seems to go on forever; the road I’d always imagined would lead me straight to my dreams. Instead of testing the waters of hope, I turned my head to the right and squint.

Sure enough, a tiny little farm house sat on the top of a hill, surrounded on three sides by wheat and the tall pale grass that grew seemingly everywhere in Wyndow. I knew what was on the other side of the hill because it was where my great uncle Butch lived, and where I worked 5- 6 days of the week; on the other side of the hill were cows, chickens, and bunnies.

No later had I just made out the beginning of downtown Wyndow that my bus arrived.

On the ride through Wyndow I looked, somewhat enviously, at all of the people bustling about in their cute homes and cafes, most undoubtedly getting ready to go to Mountain View Academy, the prestigious private school that my aunt Elizabeth couldn’t afford.

Wyndow Public High School was only a mere mile away from Mountain View, and if you looked close enough you could see the top of the tall, main building.

I turn my head from the view, keeping my head down as I walked of the bus and to my locker. The buzz of talk in the crowded hallways brushed past my ears, and I paid no attention to the crowd next to my locker. I grab my books and start to walk down the hall to my first class, but a hand on my shoulder stops me.

I whirl around, my one free hand ready to land a blow in the face to Will, the constant headache of a boy who follows me around like a shadow with his cocky questions. Instead I find the smirking face of Jacob Darwin, class clown and king of stupidity. I snarl at him and shrug my shoulder out of his grasp, turning on my heel. Jacob grabs my wrist with his hand, and I whirl around, thrusting my hand out to punch Jacob in the face. Instead he catches my hand and pushes me up against the nearest set of lockers. He leans down and says in my ear, “Try me.”

“Let go of me,” I growl, then add, “What do you want?”

Jacob smirks, his eyes gleaming with something I couldn’t quite place. “I want to know if you got a certain invitation to a certain party. And I want you to go with me.”

I laugh bitterly, pushing him off me and readjusting my books in my arms. “Like I’d tell you if I got invited to a party. And even if I did, there’s no way on God’s earth I’d go with you.”

“Why not?” He calls after me as I storm away, and I clench my fists, not answering him.

I manage to get through all my classes without bumping into Jacob Darwin again, and I breathe another long sigh of relief once I get home. I throw my stuff down on my bed and head down the road to Butch’s farm, taking note of how the sun is basking everything in an angelic golden light.

I’m almost to Butch’s farm when I stop in my tracks, overcome by an urge I can’t explain. I turn my head to the left and out toward the ocean, breathing in the gentle air. I look back again at Butch’s farm and shake my head. I needed to cool off. Bits and pieces of memories were racing through my head, and I knew the one place that would put them at rest.

 

 


 

 

After crossing through the field tall pale grass I reach the sandy beaches of Wyndow, my house and the farm at my back. I can feel hot, angry tears build behind my eyes, and I hate myself for it. I grab the nearest pebble out of the rocky sand and hurl it into the ocean, the large splash only half satisfying the angry snake curled inside of me.

“You made me like this,” I whisper out into the ocean, hoping my vile mother could hear me, wherever she is. I shake my head, but the memory comes anyway.

 

 


 

 

I stare into the empty eyes of the woman who calls herself my mother. She’s sad looking, with short bleach blonde hair instead of the long brown locks I remember. Her glasses are long gone, and her clothing is dirty and skimpy. Her bright red lipstick is a little smeared, and the rain is making her mascara run down her face like inky tears.

“Please, my little Aurora, I’m your mother, I swear-”

“You aren’t my mother. You are Diana Markley, and that is all you will ever be. Get out of my face. Get out of this town.” My hands are clenched, and my nails are digging moon shapes in the sensitive skin of my palm. My voice is loud and I think, “if she doesn’t move now, I might punch her.”

Apparently not getting the memo, my mo- Diana starts again. “Please, can you not help your own mother in a time of need?” I reeled back.

“So, if I’m not mistaken, you did not come here to see your daughter, whom you abandoned, you instead came for… what? Money? Well, you’re not getting any from me. Goodbye Diana.” The door slammed shut, and I never saw my mother again.

 

 


 

 

I collapse on the ground, exhausted with the effort of holding back my emotions for so long. I glance up at the fluffy white clouds decorating the pale blue sky and bring myself together, locking away my emotions like I usually do. I sit up and sigh, making a silent prayer to my dad. “Looks like I have a party to get ready for.”


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